• Rhombic Dodecs, Sequences, and Series

    by  • July 14, 2013 • 0 Comments

    A week or so ago, the folks at MathMunch posted a piece about rhombic dodecs. Well, I love solid geometry, and it tied into my earlier study of honeycombs, so I was quickly hooked! I revised the nets they provided using GeoGebra, so I could locate the center of each rhombus to attach a magnet. I printed them...

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    My Day Job

    by  • July 13, 2013 • 0 Comments

    I haven’t written anything yet about the fantastic group with whom I work, so I wanted to share a few things now. I am the Math Education Specialist for the Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences, one of the programs created and implemented by the Center for 21st Century Skills at EDUCATION CONNECTION, a...

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    Creative License

    by  • July 10, 2013 • 0 Comments

    One of the math teachers I follow on Twitter, Michael, made this great program to illustrate that inscribed polygons formed by connecting the midpoints of the prior polygon (concave or convex) will converge to a convex polygon. Try it: Not only is it super-cool mathematically, but it’s gorgeous! I couldn’t resist, I used some...

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    G(D(x)) and D(G(x))

    by  • July 10, 2013 • 0 Comments

    In the spirit of fun and collaboration, I set out to create graphs that brought together my favorite online math tools. G(x) is GeoGebra and D(x) is Desmos (thanks to the folks at Desmos for the title concept). With encouragement from my GeoGebra tweep, John, and shading help from my Desmos tweeps, Mary , Bob,...

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    Get Ready

    by  • July 6, 2013 • 2 Comments

    OK, your kids come in the room, they chat, they stall, they complain, this one has no pencil, this one wants to go to the nurse, these 4 “need” the bathroom, those two are “secretly” texting, and that one is putting on makeup…sound familiar? Teaching 3 freshman classes at the end of the day,...

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    Motion Detectors in Algebra1

    by  • July 6, 2013 • 2 Comments

    This is a TI-CBR2, sometimes called a sonic ranger. No, not that kind… A sonic ranger measures the distance to a moving object by bouncing ultrasonic sound off the object and timing the echoes. The data, taken about every 0.05 sec., is read into a computer, which then plots the distance, velocity, and acceleration....

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